Co-Beligerence?

Give me one reason for what you’re doing.

“Well, I think that it’s a useful thing to do. Perhaps we can stop the abortion legislation.”

My friend, do you, as a Christian, believe that aligning yourself with Mormons, Roman Catholics, Muslims and Greek Orthodox people is the right way to solve the problem?

“I suspect so. Why not? After all, there are several well-known Christians in the group.”

Is that your standard of faith and practice—what famous people do?

“Well, no. But they seem convinced that it’s right. I’m sure they have their reasons.”

Do you know what they are?

“Well, no.”

“And you are about to align yourself with Muslims and Mormons without even hearing them?

“Well, I don’t see why not, if the cause is right.”

You know this sort of fraternizing with unbelievers all began with Francis Schaffer’s ideas of “Co-Belligerence.” Do you really think that was right?

“Can’t see where it is wrong.”

Can God’s work be done by Mormons?

“Well, I suppose not, unless He’s using them in some special way.”

Have you discovered this “special way?”

“No. But . . .”

The Roman Catholic church—if you call it such—insults the Lord Jesus Christ by teaching that His work on the cross was insufficient, so the sacrifice of the mass is necessary to supplement it. Mormons believe that they are the only true church—there was none on the face of the earth until they “restored” it. And they believe in an infinite number of gods. Muslims—well, you can hear enough on Fox News to know what their views are. To make common cause with these people is a violation of II Corinthians 6: 14-18 where God forbids such associations. You “have nothing,” as Paul say, “in common” with them—nothing! They all deny your Lord in one way or another.

“I know but . . .”

But nothing! They all are in league with the evil one. Do you want to be in that sort of association yourself?

“Well, I guess not . . “

Then think! The association of Christians with such groups softens their witness. They get to know them, pal around with them in meetings, and . . .first thing you know, they are thinking (or even saying) ”They’re not so bad after all; I like them.” In order to make common cause, you must subdue your beliefs, not to offend. And, you will have learned your first lesson in how not to stand for Christ, or witness to the truth.

Since you’re so interested in following the lead of outstanding Christians, try this one on:  Would Paul make common cause with the Judaizers against the Roman government? Or Jesus with the Pharisees and Sadducees?

“Boy. You sure lay it on.”

Right. You needed it, my friend, didn’t you?

“I think so.”

Going to attend that meeting?

“Well . . . “

Here’s the phone. Why not call up the compromising Christian friend who invited you, and tell him why you won’t be there? Perhaps you can persuade him to do likewise.

“You’re right. I’ll do it. Pass it over to me.”

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